Battle of the White Jackets: Dermatologists versus Estheticians

dermatologist talks to patient about skin care

dermatologist speaks to patient about skin Dermatologists and estheticians both treat the skin. But we each treat the skin differently. As an esthetician, my license allows me to only treat the epidermis, or the outermost layer of the skin. I treat the layer of skin that you see. Doctors can treat anything from the epidermis down to the deepest layers of the skin. They treat the layers that support the visible layer of the skin.

Dermatologists cure medical conditions, while estheticians focus on the beautification of the skin. [Tweet this!]

I can help you control chronic conditions like eczema, acne, or rosacea, but I cannot prescribe medicine if that’s what you need. I can help you build a routine around a prescription. People can tolerate different levels of prescription meds, and I can help you to balance your routine around your new treatment. I can offer alternatives if your prescriptions are causing your skin to be sensitized, or experiencing excessive redness, flaking, or tenderness. I can help fill in the holes in your routine if you’re still not seeing theesthetician applies aloe mask in a facial results you want.

I don’t see this as an either/or kind of question, but lots of dermatologists seem to. To be fair, there are many dermatologists that respect what estheticians do. There are plenty of dermatologists that recommend great products. But there are times that the recommendations some dermatologists make are aggressive and over-drying. I have seen dermatologists put patients on a daily Retin-A and a glycolic pad (nevermind that AHAs and retinoids break each other down, making both ingredients ineffective) or Retin-A without a moisturizer. I believe that if you are on an aggressive product like a prescription, you may need to go more gentle with other aspects like cleanser or moisturizer. I feel some dermatologists neglect to help their patients with the entire picture.

So what does this mean to you? If you have a chronic condition or a funny mole, see a dermatologist. If you are concerned about a dull complexion or just not looking your best, see an esthetician. Ultimately, we can all work together to get you your best glow.

 

 

Like this post? Get skin tips and tricks delivered directly to your inbox by signing up for the newsletter!

One thought on “Battle of the White Jackets: Dermatologists versus Estheticians

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *